Five Great Gretsch Chet Atkins Album Covers

The great Chet Atkins was a prolific artist, to say the least. From 1952 to 1996, he released dozens of albums; many dozens more if you count live albums, compilations, collaborations, work as a sideman and, after his 2001 passing, posthumous releases. Atkins’ most prolific studio years spanned the 1950s and 1960s. This encompasses the

Top 5 Gretsch Road Trip Songs

Hopefully you have at least one road trip planned for the summer. And whether you’re driving in a Toyota Prius or a ’64 Chevy Impala, a solid soundtrack is a must.  It’s an important list, one that requires the requisite consideration to match the tempo of the ride and the terrain of the pavement. We

Five (More) Great Gretsch Movie Moments

We offered a list of five great Gretsch movie moments a few months back. Since there’s plenty more where they came from, however, here are a few more great Gretsch cinematic appearances. Help!, 1965 Directed by Richard Lester, Help!, was the second feature film from the Beatles.  The comedy adventure’s plot was based around the band running up against an evil cult that was about to sacrifice a woman to the goddess Kaili.  Unfortunately, the woman in question is not wearing the sacrificial ring.  Guess who has the ring stuck on their finger?  Beatles drummer Ringo Starr. We won’t spoil the rest of the flick for you, but it should be noted that there were several musical performances during Help!, as well, and the soundtrack was even released as an album.  Most notably during a performance of “You’re Going to Lose That Girl” in the film, George Harrison is seen strumming a Country Gentleman.

Gretsch on ’60s U.S. Series TV

Gretsch guitars were all over the tube in the 1960s. Big hollow-body guitars remained in widespread use in rock and pop throughout the entire decade, and it seemed at times as though you couldn’t throw a rock without hitting a TV set that was showing some variety or music show featuring some band that had

Five Rockin’ Gretsch Movie Moments

—————— The summer blockbuster movie season is upon us, and we’ve got movies on the mind after thinking about some of the best Gretsch moments that have graced the silver screen over the years. From rock to country to rockabilly, bands both real and fictitious have reached for Gretsch instruments, whether electric or acoustic. So with that in mind, here are five great Gretsch moments from feature films:

Five Great Gretsch Songs of the 90s

Ask most people about music in the 1990s, and they’ll probably point to grunge’s dominance during the early part of the decade and bubblegum pop towards the end as main mile markers. Gretsch artists and their trusty guitars certainly had several standout moments in those areas. But whether it was the straightforward punk from Tim Armstrong and Rancid or the infectious rockabilly of Brian Setzer, Gretsch played a big part in many other genres, as well.

Five Great Gretsch Holiday Songs

By this time of year, we’ve all been inundated with holiday music for weeks. The standards are inescapable, as it seems that every radio station is blaring some version of “Silent Night” or “Santa Claus is Coming to Town.” We tend to look in different places for our Christmas tunes. Sure, there might be a time and a place for some Manheim Steamroller, but there are so many more gems out there that can serve as a much-needed changeup. So as we get ready to unwrap presents and sip on some nutmeg-infused eggnog, here are five great Gretsch holiday tunes that should be on your playlist right now:

Six Great (Extinct) Gretsch Basses

Today, Gretsch makes several highly acclaimed bass guitar models prized by players worldwide for their elegant style and seismic sound. When you see a Gretsch bass, it’s usually in the hands of a bassist who truly prizes a fine instrument and who truly appreciates the Gretsch name and tradition. Well before its fine modern-era basses, however, Gretsch made some very, shall we say, interesting forays into the bass guitar world. From its first, shall we say, unusual model in the early 1960s to another, shall we say, distinctive model at the dawn of the 1980s, Gretsch indeed truly went its own, shall we say, unconventional way when it came to anchoring the low end. Submitted for your approval here are six remarkable—and quite extinct—examples of Gretsch bass guitar history, starting at the very beginning.

Five Great Gretsch Rock Albums of the 1980s

Gretsch electric guitars loomed large in the 1950s with original-era rock ‘n’ roll and rockabilly; even larger in the 1960s with the British Invasion. They were certainly still around during the musically tumultuous 1970s, although you did have to look a little harder. And then the 1980s arrived. The 1980s. That was the decade when